About Me. Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Scott Vrable* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Scott Vrable Portrait

Growing balder by the minute, Scott Vrable is a designer and front-end web developer who works on the Perfect Audience team at Marin Software in San Francisco, California. He designs and develops web sites and applications in his spare time. (Previously, Scott worked in New York City for Macmillan Publishers in the world-famous Flatiron Building by day and taught web-development classes at Noble Desktop by night.)

In July of 2012, Scott married the love of his life, Joanne Lee, a brilliant, talented, beautiful forensic scientist who tolerates his non-stop barrage of puns exceptionally well. They live in East Bay with its exorbitant rent prices and Oakland hipster spillover.

Scott hails from the town of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, located about 30 miles outside of Pittsburgh. He is proud to note that Greensburg is a “significant source of natural gas” and leads the nation in Bigfoot sightings east of the Mississippi. (Seriously, it was a great place to grow up.)

Frequently Asked Questions

Q.

You're a jerk! Why did you leave Jennifer Aniston for Angelina Jolie?

A.

Sorry, that's Brad Pitt.

Q.

I loved your work in Seven Years in Tibet! How did you prepare for that role?

A.

Again, that's Brad Pitt.

Q.

Is it true that you had a dream once where you were best friends with the cast of "Saved by the Bell" and then you woke up and you were really disappointed that it wasn't real?

A.

Jeez, I was only, like, 25 when that happened.

Q.

What exactly do you mean by "custom Wordpress themes?" Isn't Wordpress just a blogging platform?

A.

Back when it first started, Wordpress was mostly a blogging platform but it's come a long, long way since then and is now the number one content management system on the web. And by "custom themes," I mean that I've coded all the HTML, CSS and JavaScript/jQuery from the ground up by hand. In other words, I can make the site look and perform however I want. I then attach a customized version of the Wordpress backend to it which allows the site owner/administrator to update the site's content without having to touch any code.

And, although Wordpress can easily support a blog site, most of the sites I've made with it don't even have a blog component. For example, the site you're on right now is a custom Wordpress theme just like I described above. It can look like anything and, pretty much, be anything.

Q.

Okay, so what's "responsive design?"

A.

Responsive design means that the content of the page is designed to rearrange itself no matter what the screen size or device. In other words, the same site may present its content one way on your 27-inch desktop monitor but another way—that's just as accessible and optimized—on your smartphone (and everything in between).

For example, if you're viewing this page on a desktop or laptop monitor, drag the browser window in and out horizontally. See how everything rearranges? If you're on a mobile device or tablet, rotate it 90 degrees. See how everything expands or contracts to use the available space? That's responsive design. Typically speaking, in this day and age, you only notice when you bring up a site on your mobile device and it's not responsive.

Q.

Wait a minute, smart guy! I brought up one of your so-called "responsive emails" on my smartphone and it wasn't responsive at all!

A.

I'm guessing you're either: a) viewing it on certain Android devices like a Samsung Galaxy (or, *gasp!* a Windows phone) or b) you're viewing it on your iPhone via the Gmail app. (Or, c) it's one of those gigantic Android "phablets" that are so big they can display the standard desktop layout and shelter you from rain in the process.)

Unlike responsive websites, we still have a long way to go when it comes to rendering responsive HTML emails across devices. The most popular Android devices just plain don't support them and the Gmail app on the iPhone doesn't either. Sorry. At this point in time, responsive emails are still primarily geared toward iPhone users and a minority of Android users. Otherwise, they just fall back to the standard desktop layout.

Q.

Why don't your sites work in IE6?! What kind of web developer are you?

A.

I hate to break it to you, but, with a couple exceptions, my sites probably don't work in IE7, either. And I'm not alone in that. While I can make it at least presentable in IE7, most developers (even Microsoft) agree that it's just not worth it any more. Older versions of Internet Explorer are hopelessly outdated and have held the web back for long enough. IE6 and 7, by most accounts, have less than a one percent market share worldwide. I still support IE8 at this point in time, but, god-willing, the need for that will end very soon as well.

Q.

I bet working on the Ocean's Eleven, Twelve and Thirteen movies was a blast, wasn't it? What's George Clooney like?

A.

...Once again, you're thinking of—

Yeah, it was a total blast! That George can be a real prankster sometimes like that time he got me with the thing and the other thing. But don't worry, I'm going to get him back, somehow.

Well, nice talking with you, but I think Angie's waiting outside so I'd better get going. Bye.